Campus Biodiversity

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Biodiversity at the Tata Zoo Campus - Aimed towards a greener environment!

To maintain the diversity in ecosystems, the Tata Steel Zoological Park has an extensive combination of flora and fauna to balance its natural surroundings. A balance in the ecosystems, species and genetics is vital for the environment. This is the primary reason why we aim to keep the natural habitats intact for our animals, birds and reptile species. A number of exotic plants have also found a place in our zoo, contributing to its natural environment.

The different animal species, birds, reptiles and insects maintain the biodiversity of our zoo along with the various plant species. A variety of about 20 plant species is available within the zoo, which many may not be even aware of.

Here are some of the plant species with their scientific and local names given below which you can find at our zoo:

  • SL
    Scientific name
    Local Name
  • 1
    Adina cordifolia
    Karam
  • 2
    Aegle marmelos
    Bel
  • 3
    Azadirachta indica
    Neem
  • 4
    Bombax ceiba
    Semal
  • 5
    Bauhinia blakeana
    Kaniar
  • 6
    Bauhinia purpurea
    Kaniar
  • 7
    Cassia siamea
    Chakundi
  • 8
    Cordia myxa
    Lasora
  • 9
    Dalbergia sissoo
    Shisham
  • 10
    Ficus carica
    Dumar/Fig
  • 11
    Ficus benghalensis
    Barh
  • 12
    Ficus religiosa
    Pipal
  • 13
    Inga dulcis
    Jagaljalebi
  • 14
    Madhuca longifolia
    Mahua
  • 15
    Schleichera oleosa
    Kusum
  • 16
    Shorea robusta
    Sal
  • 17
    Terminalia arjuna
    Arjun
  • 18
    Ziziphus jujube
    Ber
  • 19
    Neolamarckia cadamba
    Kadamb
  • 20
    Butea monosperma
    Palash

The flora and fauna together contribute to form a balanced eco system within the park and its natural surroundings.



There are about 36 varieties of birds found within the Tata Steel Zoological Park. The species of birds which have made the zoo campus their home include:

  • Red Vented Bulbul
  • Red whiskered bulbul
  • Grey Partridge
  • Stone Curlew
  • Purple Sunbird
  • Hoopoe
  • Golden Oriole
  • Coppersmith Barbet
  • Common Mynah
  • Asian pied starling
  • Brahmny Mynah
  • Small blue kingfisher
  • White Breasted Kingfisher
  • Koel
  • Common Crow
  • Crow Pheasant
  • Baya
  • Kite
  • Parakeets
  • Green Bee-Eater
  • Black Drongo
  • Magpie Robin
  • Spotted Dove
  • Ring Necked dove
  • Spotted munia
  • Rock Pigeon
  • Little Cormorant
  • Darter
  • White Breasted Water Hen
  • Lesser whistling teal
  • Common Coot
  • Jacana
  • Pond heron
  • Night heron
  • Cattle egret
  • Little Egre

Mammals are the largest of animals. The Tata Steel Zoological Park is a sanctuary to a number of mammals that include the Jungle Cat, Jackal, Bengal Mongoose, Fruit Bats, Common Rat and Three Stripped Squirrel. Each mammal has its own characteristics and there is a lot to learn from observing them.

A variety of reptiles make the Tata Steel Zoological park rich in bio-diversity. Reptiles like the Python, Rat Snake, King Cobra, Krait and the Garden Lizard that have been found wild in nature are easily available inside the zoo campus.

PISCES & MOLLUSC

The Janyanti sarovar lake, which adds beauty to the zoo landscape harbours rich variety of fishes like Rahu, Katla, Cat Fish, Garai (Channa gachua), Cheng (Channa pangtatus) and Pontius. The lake is also home to various species of mollusc like pond snail, unio, pila and melanoids.

Why butterflies are important

There are many reasons why butterflies are important, both in their own right but also as quality of life indicators. The following attributes form the rationale for conserving butterflies in India and around the world.

Ecosystem value

  • Butterflies are indicators of a healthy environment and healthy ecosystems.
  • They indicate a wide range of other invertebrates, which comprise over two-thirds of all species.
  • Areas rich in butterflies are rich in other invertebrates. These collectively provide a wide range of environmental benefits, including pollination and natural pest control.
  • Butterflies are an important element of the food chain and are prey for birds, bats and other insectivorous animals.
  • Butterflies support a range of other predators and parasites, many of which are specific to individual species, or groups of species.
  • Butterflies have been widely used by ecologists as model organisms to study the impact of habitat loss and fragmentation, and climate change.

Educational value

  • Butterflies have fascinating life-cycles that are used in many countries to teach children about the natural world. The transformation from egg to caterpillar to chrysalis is one of the wonders of nature.
  • Other educational aspects include the intricate wing patterns and iridescence, and as examples of insect migration.

Scientific value

  • Butterflies are an extremely important group of ‘model’ organisms used, for centuries, to investigate many areas of biological research, including such diverse fields as navigation, pest control, embryology, mimicry, evolution, genetics, population dynamics and biodiversity conservation.
  • The long history and popularity of butterfly study have provided a unique data resource on an insect group unmatched in geographical scale and timescale anywhere in the world. This has proved extremely important for scientific research on climate change.

Local Diversity:

77 species of butterflies belonging to 5 families have been recorded in Jamshedpur locality. Nymphalidae dominated the list, followed by Lycaenidae, Pieridae, Papilionidae & Hesperidae respectively (Sambath, S. 2014. Taxonomic Studies of Lepidoptera (Insecta) of Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary, Jharkhand, (India). Rec. zool. Surv. India, Occ. Paper No., 359 : 1-103+23 Plates. (published by the Director, Zool. Surv. India, Kolkata)

A. Family HESPERIIDAE

  • 1. Caprona ransonnettii ransonnettii (Felder, 1868)
  • 2. Ceiaenorrhinus ambareesa (Moore, 1865)
  • 3. Celaenorrhinus leucocera leucocera (Kollar, 1848)
  • 4. Tagiades iitigiosa Moschler, 1878
Subfamily HEPERIINAE
  • 5. Borbo cinnara (Wallace, 1866)
  • 6. Pelopidas mathias mathias (Fabricius, 1798)
  • 7. Udaspes JOlus (Cramer, 1775)

B. Family LYCAENIDAE


Subfamily CURETINAE
  • 8. Curetis dentata dentata Moore, 1879
Subfamily THECLINAE / Tribe AMBLYPODINI
  • 9. Amblypodia anita dina (Fruhstorfer, 1907)
Tribe ARHOPAUNI
  • 10. Arhopala amantes amantes (Hewitson, 1862)
Tribe DEUDORIGINI
  • 11. Deudorix epiJarbas epiJarbas Moore, 1857
  • 12. Rapala varuna varuna (Horsefield, 1829)
Subfamily LYCAENINAE
  • 13. Edales pandava pandava (Horsfield, 1829)
Tribe APHNAEINI
  • 14. Spindasis vulcanus vulcanus (Fabricius, 1775)
Subfamily POLYOMMATINAE / Tribe POLYOMMATINI
  • 15. Jamides bochus bochus Stoll, 1782
  • 16. Casta/ius rosimon rosimon (Fabricius, 1775)
Subfamily NEMEOBIINAE
  • 17. Abisara echerius suffusa Moore, 1882
  • 18. Tajuria cippus (Fabricius, 1798)
  • 19. Virachola isocrates (Fabricius, 1793)

C. Family NYMPHALIDAE


Subfamily DANAINAE / Tribe DANAINI
  • 20. Danaus chrysippus chrysippus (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • 21. Danaus genutia (Cramer, 1779)
  • 22. Tellervo /imniace leopardus (Butler, 1866)
Tribe EUPLOEINI
  • 23. Euploea core core (Cramer, 1780)
Subfamily CHARAXINAE / Tribe CHARAXINAE
  • 24. Charaxes polyxena imna Butler, 1870
  • 25. Po/yura arja (C. & R. Felder, 1867)
Subfamily HELICONIINAE / Tribe ACRAEINI
  • 26. Acraea violae (Fabricius, 1775)
Tribe ARGYNNINI
  • 27. Phalanta phalantha phalantha (Drury, 1770)
Subfamily UMENITINAE / Tribe BmLINI
  • 28. Ariadne ariadne indica (Moore, 1884)
  • 29. Ariadne merione (Cramer, 1779)
Tribe LIMENITINI
  • 30. Ellthalia Ilibentina indica Fruhstorfer, 1904
  • 31. Limenitis proms proms (Cramer, 1777)
  • 32. Pantoporia hordonia hordonia (Stoll, 1791)
  • 33. Parathyma nefte inara (Doubleday, 1850)
  • 34. Parathyma peri liS perills (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • 35. Parathyma ranga (Moore, 1857)
  • 36. Phae4Jma coilimelia ophiana (Moore, 1872)
  • 37. Symphaedra nais Forster, 1771
  • 38. Tanaecia lepidea lepidea (Butler, 1868)
  • 39. Neptis ciinia Moore, 1872
  • 40. Neptis flylas astola Moore, 1872
Subfamily CYRESTINAE / Tribe NEPTINI
  • 41. Cyrestis tflyodamas thyodamas Boisduval, 1836
Subfamily NYMPHALINAE / Tribe KALLIMINI
  • 42. Hypolimnas bolina (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • 43. Hypolimnas missipplls (Linnaeus, 1764)
  • 44. Junonia almana almana (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • 45. Junonia atlites (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • 46. Junonia iphita p/llviata/is (Fruhstorfer, 1900)
  • 47. Junonia lemonias vaisya (Fruhstorfer, 1912)
  • 48. Junonia orithya swinhoei Butler, 1885
Subfamily STYRINAE / Tribe MELANITINI
  • 49. Melanitis- leda ismene (Cramer, 1775)
Tribe EL YMNIINI
  • 50. Mycalesis minells pofydecta (Cramer, 1777)
Tribe SATYRINI
  • 51. Ypthima iniea Hewitson, 1865

D. Family PAPILIONIDAE


Subfamily PAPILIONINAE / Tribe LEPTOCIRCINI
  • 52. Graphillm antiphates pompilills (Fabricius, 1775)
  • 53. Graphillm (Graphillm) doson eleills (Fruhstorfer, 1908)
  • 54. Graphillm nomills (Esper, 1793)
Tribe PAPILIONINI
  • 55. Chilasa elytia j dissimi/is (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • 56. Papilio crino (Fabricius, 1793)
  • 57. Papilio demolells demolells Linnaeus, 1758
  • 58. Papilio polymnestor po!Jmnestor Cramer, 1775
  • 59 Papilio polytes Linnaeus, 1758
  • 60. Paehliopta aristoloehiae (Fabricius, 1775)

E. Family PIERIDAE


Subfamily COLIADINAE / Tribe COLIADINI
  • 61. Catopsilia croeale Cramer, 1775
  • 62. Catopsilia flore/Ia gnoma (Fabricius, 1775)
  • 63. Catopsilia pomona (Fabricius, 1775)
  • 64. Catopsilia pyranthe pyranthe (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • 65. Eurema blanda silhetana (Wallace, 1867)
  • 66. Eurema brigitta rubella (Wallace, 1867)
  • 67. Eurema heeabe eontllbernalis (Moore, 1886)
  • 68. Eurema heeabe jimbriata (Wallace, 1832)
  • 69. Eurema heeabe simlilata (Moore, 1881)
  • 70. Eurema laeta laeta (Boisduval, 1836)
  • 71. Eurema sari sodalis (Moore, 1886)
Tribe PIERINAE
  • 72. Anaphaeis allrota allrota (Fabricius, 1793)
  • 73. Cepora nerissa phryne (Fabricius, 1775)
  • 74. Delias elleharis (Drury, 1773)
  • 75. Delias hyparete ethire (Doherty, 1886)
  • 76. Leptosia nina nina (Fabricius, 1781)
  • 77. Valeria valeria hippia (Fabricius, 1787)